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Pauline mazumdar essay prize

British evolutionary biologist, eugenicist, and internationalist. Huxley was well known for his presentation of science in books and articles, and on radio and television. He directed an Oscar-winning wildlife pauline mazumdar essay prize. There is a public house named after Sir Julian in Selsdon, London Borough of Croydon, close to the Selsdon Wood Nature Reserve which he helped establish.

Huxley came from the distinguished Huxley family. Huxley was born on 22 June 1887, at the London house of his aunt, the novelist Mary Augusta Ward, while his father was attending the jubilee celebrations of Queen Victoria. At Eton he developed an interest in ornithology, guided by science master W. Piggy was a genius as a teacherĀ  I have always been grateful to him. In 1906, after a summer in Germany, Huxley took his place in Oxford, where he developed a particular interest in embryology and protozoa. In the autumn term of his final year, 1908, his mother died from cancer at only 46: a terrible blow for her husband, three sons, and eight-year-old daughter Margaret.

While at Oxford, he developed a friendship with the ornithologist William Warde Fowler. Huxley was awarded a scholarship to spend a year at the Naples Marine Biological Station where he developed his interest in developmental biology by investigating sea squirts and sea urchins. In 1912 his life took a new turn. Houston, Texas, which he accepted, planning to start the following year.

Before taking up the post of Assistant Professor at the Rice Institute, Huxley spent a year in Germany preparing for his demanding new job. Working in a laboratory just months before the outbreak of World War I, Huxley overheard fellow academics comment on a passing aircraft “it will not be long before those planes are flying over England”. In September 1916 Huxley returned to England from Texas to assist in the war effort. She was a French Swiss girl whom he had met at Garsington Manor, the country house of Lady Ottoline Morrell, a Bloomsbury Group socialite with a penchant for artists and intellectuals. Huxley with his two sons, Anthony and Francis. In 1925 Huxley moved to King’s College London as Professor of Zoology, but in 1927, to the amazement of his colleagues and on the prodding of H.

As the 1930s started, Huxley travelled widely and took part in a variety of activities which were partly scientific and partly political. In 1931 Huxley visited the USSR at the invitation of Intourist, where initially he admired the results of social and economic planning on a large scale. In the 1930s Huxley visited Kenya and other East African countries to see the conservation work, including the creation of national parks, which was happening in the few areas that remained uninhabited due to malaria. From 1933 to 1938 he was a member of the committee for Lord Hailey’s African Survey. Huxley lights a cigarette under his grandfather’s portrait, c. In 1935 Huxley was appointed secretary to the Zoological Society of London, and spent much of the next seven years running the society and its zoological gardens, the London Zoo and Whipsnade Park, alongside his writing and research. In 1941 Huxley was invited to the United States on a lecturing tour, and generated some controversy by saying that he thought the United States should join World War II: a few weeks later came the attack on Pearl Harbor.

When the US joined the war, he found it difficult to get a passage back to the UK, and his lecture tour was extended. In 1943 he was asked by the British government to join the Colonial Commission on Higher Education. The Commission’s remit was to survey the West African Commonwealth countries for suitable locations for the creation of universities. There he acquired a disease, went down with hepatitis, and had a serious mental breakdown.

His term of office, six years in the Charter, was cut down to two years at the behest of the American delegation. Another post-war activity was Huxley’s attack on the Soviet politico-scientist Trofim Lysenko, who had espoused a Lamarckian heredity, made unscientific pronouncements on agriculture, used his influence to destroy classical genetics in Russia and to move genuine scientists from their posts. In addition to his international and humanist concerns, his research interests covered evolution in all its aspects, ethology, embryology, genetics, anthropology and to some extent the infant field of cell biology. Huxley was a friend and mentor of the biologists and Nobel laureates Konrad Lorenz and Niko Tinbergen, and taught and encouraged many others. Huxley and biologist August Weismann insisted on natural selection as the primary agent in evolution. Huxley was a major player in the mid-twentieth century modern evolutionary synthesis.